New History & Classics Courses

The department of History & Classics has been hard at work creating new courses to meet the needs and interests of today's students. We're extremely excited to announce the following new courses for the 2016-2017 academic year.

CLASS 291: Introduction to Scientific Terminology

*3 (fi 6) (either term; 3-0-0)
The vast majority of technical terms in the sciences (e.g., Biological Sciences, Geology, Medicine, Dentisty) derive from Greek and Latin and understanding such terms is often a daunting task for students who lack a background in Greek and Latin. In this course, students will learn the Greek and Latin elements from which scientific terms are created and so develop a broader scientific vocabulary and a greater understanding of origins, formation and meaning of technical vocabulary. As a spoonful of sugar to help the terminology go down, we will also examine the historical, cultural, artistic, and literary background to provide some context for the creation of the scientific terminology from Greek and Latin roots. In addition to making it easier to understand and become conversant with the drier aspects of the topic, this additional material is interesting in its own right and gives students further insight into the historical development of scientific thinking. No prior knowledge of Greek or Latin is required or assumed.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
W17 86458 LEC B1 MWF 0900 - 0950
T B 87
Kelly Macfarlane

CLASS 330: From Alexander the Great to Cleopatra: The Hellenistic World

*3 (fi 6) (either term; 3-0-0)
The turbulent history of the Hellenistic world from Alexander the Great to the defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. Special emphasis will be placed upon Alexander the Great, his Successors, and the development of the Hellenistic kingdoms.
Alexander the Great of Macedon conquered most of the known world in less than a decade. After his sudden death in 323 BC, his commanders carved up his newly-acquired empire among themselves. No sooner had they done so, then these self-styled Successors to Alexander began to engage in decades of bloody internecine conflict, each of them attempting to wrest control of the empire as a whole from the others and rule it himself. When the death of the old warrior Antigonus the One-Eyed at the Battle of Ipsus made it clear that no one person would inherit Alexander’s empire, the Successors carved out personal kingdoms for themselves and developed new royal ideologies to justify and legitimize their rule, until eventually they were divided and conquered by the Roman juggernaut.
In this course, we will examine a number of historical questions: Was Alexander the Great poisoned? What happened to Alexander’s sons? Why did no one inherit Alexander’s empire? Why were all the Successors good-looking? What happened to the Athenian democracy under the Successors? What did the Greeks think of their Macedonian overlords? Why did the Ptolemies marry their sisters? Why were many of the Ptolemies obese? Can we distinguish fact from fiction in the love story of Antony and Cleopatra?
Original documents will be read in translation.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
W17 86459 LEC B1 MWF 0900 - 0950
T BW 2
Frances Pownall

HIST 128: War, Revolution, and Society

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0)
The causes, course, and consequences of major conflicts around the globe, including their wider social effects.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
F16 66951
LEC A1 MWF 1200 - 1250
T BW 1
Heather Coleman
Guy Thompson
W17 86759
LEC B1 MWF 1000 - 1050
ED 228
Guy Thompson
Heather Coleman

HIST 289: Introduction to Classical India

*3 (fi 6) (either term; 3-0-0).
The world of Classical India, from the emergence of the Mauryan Empire in the fourth century BCE to the close of the Gupta Empire in the fifth century CE.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
F16 66598 LEC A1
TR 1100 - 1220
ED 276
Dominik Wujastyk

HIST 293: History of Science, Technology and Medicine: Key Moments

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).
Concentrates on key events and pivotal moments in the history of science, technology, and medicine through the study of a wide variety of historical sources, such as photographs, artifacts, films, letters, lab notebooks and diaries. The focus this year is on the history of science and will examine, among other topics, Galileo's moon drawings, Charles Darwin's notebooks and Rosalind Franklin's x-ray photographs of DNA. No previous knowledge of the history of science, technology or medicine is required.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
W17 86457 LEC B1 TR 1100 - 1230
T 1 103
Robert Smith

HIST 301: Europe in the Age of Total War, 1890-1945

*3 (fi 6) (either term; 3-0-0).
European experience with total war, economic crisis and totalitarian regimes in the new era of mass politics and Great Power conflict.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
W17 86760
LEC B1
TR 1100 - 1220
ED 106 Dennis Sweeney

HIST 387: History of Indian Yoga and Meditation

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).
The history and philosophy of early Yoga, exploring its focus on meditation, its literature, its connections with Buddhism, and its historical evolution. HIST 110, 289, or CLASS 110 are recommended but not required.

Term Class Section Days Time Location Instructor
W17 86761
LEC B1
TR 1100 - 1220
ED 158 Dominik Wujastyk

And Look for These New Courses Starting in Fall 2017!

CLASS 304: Warfare in Greco-Roman Antiquity

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).
The development from Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity of warfare, both in its technical aspects and as a political and socio-cultural phenomenon.
Prerequisite: Any of CLASS 103, 104, or any CLASS course at the 200 level or above or HIST 295 or 296. 

HIST 123: Plague: Disease and Epidemics in History

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0)
The causes, impacts, and experiences of disease in human history.

HIST 127: Drugs in Modern Global History

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).
The social, cultural, and political histories of criminalized drugs like opium, marijuana, amphetamines, and cocaine.

HIST 237: The Pacific World since 1500

*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).
Exploration, migration, trade, and geopolitics in the Pacific region, connecting Australia and the Pacific Islands with Asia and coastal North and South America.